Why Should I Take These Courses?

I'm an artist, musician, dancer, actor, film-maker, etc. Why would I be interested in one of these courses?

Digital technologies are increasingly critical to the practice of all creative makers in all disciplines. Even those working in traditional media will need basic digital skills to document and present their work. On a purely practical level, Digital Arts courses introduce students to technologies that will be important to them as professionals in their field. No new technical or creative experience is a waste of time, and only furthers your "toolbox" as an artist.

Additionally, the collaborative nature of these courses reflects current art practice, where a painter might also make online works, a musician or theater director might include live video, or a musician might use programming to build their own software instruments. From the foundation level, students are expected to work together with creative people from outside their discipline. Finding a common dialog about their processes is the most basic goal, but students are encouraged to share ideas and technical knowledge and possibly build strong collaborative relationships between the areas of the College and across the University.

Finally, as a creative maker, this might have nothing to do with your area of interest and these classes are valuable for that very reason. By learning the language of another field you enrich your own practice and potentially open up to a new way of thinking and working.

I'm an _________ major, not an artist. Why would I be interested in an art course?

Students from across the University are encouraged to consider the Digital Arts Initiative courses. Students from Computer Science, Communications, and Architecture will find direct connections to their field, though students from any and all areas are welcome. Part of the goal of the Digital Arts Initiative in interdisciplinary learning and research; by participating in these courses you will gain skills to take back to your discipline, and help foster connections between before-unconnected parts of the University.

The Digital Literacy courses are 100-level and assume no knowledge of art (drawing, design, etc) or the tools used (Photoshop, Final Cut, etc). If you have any concerns or further questions, please contact the instructor or the College of Fine and Performing Arts office.